Category Archives: Michael Tamayo

A mixed blessing for marriage

by Michael Tamayo

Social media is understandably abuzz with the Supreme Court’s Wednesday decisions on same-sex marriage. Proponents of same-sex marriage are probably ecstatic. President Obama has released a statement claiming that the decisions have righted a wrong and that the country is better for it. CNN reports that the decisions are being hailed as an historic victory, which indeed they are to some degree. But it’s important not to be carried away with the implications of the high court’s decisions. The Supreme Court hasn’t offered cut-and-dried, broad rulings regarding the issue of same-sex marriage. The decisions are probably closer to a double than a home run, and their scope is more limited than it seems at first glance.

“Governor Moonbeam,” They called him

by Michael Tamayo

They said he couldn’t do it. They said he was a hopeless romantic, dreaming the same way he had always dreamed throughout his career—with his head in the clouds and his feet in the air. He wanted too much from a political climate that budged too little. Governor Jerry Brown wanted to balance California’s budget. California: the Greece of the United States.

America’s border-centric approach to immigration reform

by Michael Tamayo

With Congress expected to unveil its plan for immigration reform soon, the country can look forward to another high-profile debate between Democrats and Republicans about another divisive issue. But there is one piece of the legislation that is attracting relatively little attention: border control. Of course, border control measures are to be anticipated in any immigration reform bill, but what the Senate’s Gang of Eight is considering is out of the ordinary.

A response: The more deserving objects of our outrage

6964717690_3e98e979e1_b

by Michael Tamayo and Taylor Daily

In a Brown Daily Herald opinions column Tuesday, Oliver Hudson argued that universal suffrage should be abandoned in favor of a system in which voting power is proportional to an individual’s share in federal income taxes. Those individuals who pay no federal income tax would not be able to vote in federal elections. Hudson argues that such a system is both moral and practical because it prevents “free riders” from exploiting the wealthy and allows for a practical method of reducing government spending and lowering taxes.

Why Mitt Romney’s taxes matter

Mitt Romney

by Michael Tamayo

It is no secret that Mitt Romney is a wealthy man. His net worth is estimated to be somewhere between $190 million and $250 million. He cofounded Bain Capital and was the “sole stockholder, chairman of the board, chief executive officer, and president” of the venture capital firm. Politicians are typically wealthier than most other Americans, but if elected, Romney would be one of the wealthiest presidents in American history. To get an idea of just how wealthy Romney is, combine the wealth of the past eight presidents, and then double that. This is the ethos Romney exudes. There is no escaping it and there is no spinning it.